Hi Readers! We’ve partnered with Pokestats to provide a weekly update on the latest League Cup results to create 2 different Tier Lists. One will be made of pure data collection and numbers while the other is the opinion of Some1sPC as voted on. We aim to consistently post this weekly displaying the growth of the meta, the rogue ideas that may pop up, and what each member of the team would recommend playing. Enjoy!

League Cup Standard Data Tier List

Data: November 18-26 — 14 Cups / 3156 CP in sample

Rank Deck CP Won %
1 Brokenvoir  676 21.42%
2 Zoroark/Golisopod-GX 540 17.11%
3 Buzzwole-GX/Lycanroc-GX GRI 251 7.95%
4 “Original” Gardevoir-GX 240 7.60%
5 Volcanion 236 7.48%
6 Decidueye-GX/Zoroark 229 7.26%
7 Metagross-GX 157 4.97%
8 Drampa-GX/Garbodor 132 4.18%
9 Zoroark/Lycanroc-GX GRI 100 3.17%
T-10 Silvally-GX/Metal

VikaBulu

90
90
2.85%
2.85%
T-12 Buzzwole-GX/Garbodor

Greninja BREAK

Sylveon-GX

82

82
82
2.60%

2.60%

2.60%

15 Solgaleo-GX/Rayquaza GRI 72 2.28%
16 Drampa-GX/Zoroark 57 1.81%
17 Volcanion/Silvally-GX 50 1.58%
T-18 Alolan Ninetales-GX/Zoroark-GX

Buzzwole-GX/Zoroark

40
40
1.27%
1.27%
T-20 Golisopod-GX/Garbodor

Ho-Oh-GX/Salazzle-GX

32

32
1.01%

1.01%

T-22 Buzzwole-GX/Crabominable

DeciTales

Espeon-GX/Garbodor

MetalBox

25

25

25

25

0.79%

0.79%

0.79%

0.79%

 

Tier 1 

Brokenvoir/Gardevoir
Zoroark/Golisopod-GX

Tier 2

Buzzwole-GX/Lycanroc-GX GRI
Volcanion
Decidueye-GX/Zoroark

Tier 3

Metagross GX
Drampa/Garbodor
Zoroark/Lycanroc GX

 

Some1spc’s Standard Tier List

 

Tier 1

Gardevoir

Gardevoir GX is one of the strongest cards ever printed in the history of the Pokemon TCG. Since it’s release, it has some of the greatest tournament accomplishments which include winning the 2017 Pokemon World Championship. It’s the most deserving deck in the group of Tier 1 and the common decklist has reached near perfection. Even with a target on its back, it’s worth considering at any event because it can still overcome those threats with its sheer power and versatility.

Golisopod Zoroark

Golisopod Zoroark is coming off an impressive showing at the International Championship in London. Upon release, it dominated its first event being tournament legal and even took home first place. The deck focuses on consistency and draw power, which allows the deck to take advantage of cards in ways that most decks aren’t capable of doing. The flexibility and multiple uses of cards like Acerola, Guzma, Enhanced Hammer make the deck incredible and worthy of being in Tier 1. This deck is coming off the most recent Standard event win so the hype train is full steam ahead.

Silvally Metal

Silvally Metal placed a strong 2nd at the International Championship in London. With Zakary Krekeler’s list becoming the pioneer for others to build off of, the deck has incredible matchups against Golisopod Zoroark as well as Gardevior GX. Silvally has the utility and versatility to throw different attackers at the opponent while having type advantage against a majority of the Meta. Right now, I expected most decks to be playing 2 Fighting Memory in order to deal with the influx of Zoroark GX decks that are bound to follow.

Tier 2

Buzzwole Lycanroc

Buzzwole Lycanroc was flying a bit under the radar going into London but after having 2 solid top 8 placings, its safe to say people will start adding it to their testing circle. The most popular build is sporting an Octillery line as well as a heavy Max Elixir line to power up its attackers quickly. Using a combination of Buzzwole to generate pressure against all the low HP Basic and Lycanroc to abuse quickly bring up these low HP Pokemon active, this deck is only going to get stronger as the Stage 1 meta continues to thrive. Having type advantage against Silvally and Zoroark only gives this more strength going into major events.

Zoroark Decidueye

Zoroark Decidueye was piloted by a bunch of top name players at London Internationals but failed to deliver a top 8 placing. The deck plays a small line of Zoroark GX alongside a thick line of Decidueye GX with the intention to spread damage then clean up with Riotous Beating. Zoroark Decidueye can also stall out turns and output continuous damage through healing options such as Acerola and Max Potion which tends to grind away games against Stage 1 decks. While the deck is quite formidable, it can suffer from awkward deck hands due to its thin Zoroark line and usage of Stage 2 Pokemon and Rare Candy without access to Sylveon GX like Gardevoir. With new additions like Alolan Vulpix and other heal options, I expect this deck to make a huge jump in play over the next few weeks.

Greninja

Greninja sits in Tier 2 because its effectiveness is dependent on how prepared the field is for Greninja. In a tournament setting without Giratina Promo and Grass attackers, then the deck will thrive and become an instant favorite to win the event. However, should the field be ready for the deck and run the appropriate counters, then the deck becomes a weak play. Even if you were to set up, which can sometimes be problematic, you will still have trouble facing down large HP Pokemon without access to Giant Water Shuriken due to Giratina Promo.

Tier 3

Volcanion

Even with a top 8 placing at London Internationals, Volcanion isn’t amongst the top tier decks in the meta. The deck hasn’t really lost any strength but the high presence of Gardevoir, the speed of Zoroark GX, and pressure from Buzzwole/Zoroark, this deck has a tough time keeping up with the rest of the meta. Even with type advantage against Golisopod GX, the tournament winning Golisopod GX/Zoroark GX doesn’t need to put a Golisopod to win the game if they’re able to string early damage around with Tapu Koko. Gardevoir is a tough matchup and there aren’t enough pure Metal and Grass decks running around for Volcanion to have free wins left and right.

Metagross

Gardevoir may be the top deck in the format but that doesn’t make Metagross automatically one of the best decks to counter the meta. As of right now, the slow speed and inconsistencies of Metagross make it an uphill battle to keep up with the aggression of Zoroark GX/Golisopod and Silvally GX. Once established, this deck can easily heal away any damage dealt by a majority of the format and coming out on top of trade scenarios. The problem is getting to that point takes a bit too long where you cannot make a comeback even with 4 Max Potion in the deck. It can still take a League Cup or two by surprise but this deck should start to fade away out of the meta.

Zoroark Lycanroc

Coming up last in Tier 3 is Zoroark Lycanroc which has recently come into the meta by copying a strategy similar to that of Golisopod Zoroark by using Heal cards and Puzzle of Time to grind out wins against the opponent. Unlike Golisopod, Lycanroc needs two attachments to get going and at times can be a rather underwhelming attacker especially when Golisopod is so popular and hits it for weakness. Using a combination of Bloodthirsty Eyes and Trade can make for some amazing field control options but overall this deck will need some more time to develop a proper Trainer engine to see if it can keep up with the Top Tier decks of the meta.

What Would The Team Play For This Weekend’s League Cup?

Bradley Curcio

Standard – Buzzwole Lycanroc
Expanded – Night March

Drew Bennett-Kennett

Standard – Zoroark Decidueye
Expanded – Greninja

Mark Garcia

Standard – Gardevoir
Expanded – Zoroark Seismitoad

Russell LaParre

Standard – Gardevoir
Expanded – Flygon Dusknoir Accelgor

Kian Amini

Standard – Gardevoir
Expanded – Zoroark Seismitoad

Marc Albright

Standard – Zoroark Golisopod
Expanded – Zoroark Golisopod

Israel Sosa

Standard – Silvally Metal
Expanded – Silvally Psychic

Kenny Britton

Standard – Buzzwole Garbodor
Expanded – Zoroark Seismitoad

Chris Taporco

Standard – Volcanion
Expanded – Zoroark Seismitoad

 

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