How’s it going Some1spc family! It’s me Mark and I’m here for my second article and I am excited to share my thoughts on the current Standard Metagame. At the same time, I’ll be going over my analysis of the recent successes of the “Tier 1” decks, decks/tech cards I would consider for the Vancouver Regional Championships, and a reveal of what my number one deck choice would be. I have my eyes set on two Standard tournaments (one Standard League Cup this weekend and Vancouver Regionals next weekend) so I am with you all trying to discover what the play is for the Standard format! Let’s take a look!

Before I begin, I would like to point out that a lot of my resources and understanding of the game comes not only from results of my actual gameplay and testing but the resources available to us from Pokémon-related websites and results posted on Pokémon online groups. This helps players like me get a feel of what the Metagame is in other areas and how consistent the top decks/players perform. Even though Pokémon related websites do have a “paywall”, I would highly consider doing a trial to see the amount of knowledge you can gain from other people’s insights and analysis. I noticed that a lot of the more consistent players in this game are doing so well because of the number of resources (close player intel, affiliation in multiple Pokémon groups, exposure to multiple Pokémon related websites, etc.) they have available to them.

Metagame

For veteran players or card freaks, this terminology may be instinctual. For the newer players, I define Metagame as the state of which there are different Tier levels of decks populated from a recognized pool of decks. In layman terms, this is what you consider the top decks to be in a field of other popular decks. It is a good practice to approach a big tournament and define for yourself what the Tier 1 decks are (decks that have shown previous successes or hype in the community) and what the consistent players in the tournament would play.

For example, at this past World Championships, the Metagame would be considered as Gardevoir GX, Grass Decks (Decidueye GX & Golisopod GX) and Garbodor variant decks (Espeon Garbodor & Drampa Garbodor). As a recent participant of the 2017 World Championships, I can say that my team and I dedicated time to figure out how to approach the Metagame. As previously said before, I like to figure out 1) what the Tier 1 decks are and 2) what decks the consistent players will most likely lean on.

Today’s Standard Format Metagame

How do you want me to describe our current standard format? Let me just bust out a quick throwback real quick.

“Day and night…I toss and turn, I keep stressing my mind, mind…I look for peace but see I don’t attain…What I need for keeps this silly game we play, play…Now look at this”

Who knew Kid Cudi was talking about the standard Metagame. It is indeed day and night because this format has seen it all. The World Championship, the Anaheim Open, the Bremen Regionals in Germany, countless weekends of League Cups and now Hartford Regional Championships, this format has had its time. Because of the many tournaments, this format has been a part of the Metagame can very well be determined based upon these results.

Analysis on the Hartford Regional Championships

This weekend was a great indicator to see what the Metagame is for this particular tournament. There were 9 different decks that made it in the Top 32. However, the most played decks in the Top 32 were:

1) Gardevoir GX with 8 showings
2) Golisipod GX with 6 showings
3) Fire Decks (Volcanion or Ho-Oh Salazzle) with 5 showings
4) Drampa Garbodor with 5 showings

As expected a lot of these decks have had recent success in the League Cups and prior high-level tournaments. It was no surprise that these were the top decks.

Here are my key takeaways about this tournament:

● There were two Greninja decks that made the Top 32 with one of them being a finalist. This was one of the better calls this day because no one really played a counter to this deck aka Giratina Promo.
● The winning Volcanion deck did not play Kiawe or Brigette! It almost seemed like this deck went full circle from the US Intercontinental Championships.
● Of the Fire decks, the only Ho-Oh Salazzle deck made it into the top 8 (Analysis in the later portion of the article).
● Parallel City came to play with most of the Gardevoir decks.
● Most of the Drampa Garbodor decks included a 1-1 Espeon GX.
● Two Decideuye decks made the Top 32!

This tournament was a treat to all the deck builders who thought that this format became stale.

So how does this affect the Metagame moving forward, especially for those competing in Standard Cups this weekend and Vancouver next weekend?

Without further ado here are the decks that I consider to be in Tier 1 of this format so far:
Gardevoir GX
Golisopod GX
Ho-Oh Salazzle

Because this article is to describe the current Metagame and the Tier 1 decks for Vancouver, I will not go in depth with matchups. However, I will explain some matchups that I feel that you should be prepared for with certain decks. If you have any questions about how to approach a matchup, please feel free to comment or send me or the team a message.

Gardevoir GX

Gardevoir has definitely earned its spot in Tier 1. I would consider this deck 50/50 with all decks in this format minus the Metal decks that hit for weakness. The consistency of this Stage 2 deck is really what drives this ranking.

What intrigues me most about this deck is its ability to play from behind. Yes, it’s a Stage 2 deck that can have those Stage 2 hands sometimes, but the way you build the deck really lets you play out those bad set up stages. In addition, Twilight GX is what I consider the best GX attack in the game. It allows you to play those thin lines and tech cards because you can reuse them later in the game after using Twilight GX. In the Bremen Regional Championships it was the most played deck in the Top 32 with 9 making it to Day 2.
Thanks to Limitless TCG, here is the highest placed Gardevoir list that made it in the Top 32 Bremen Regional Championships:

Gardevoir 5th Place Philipp Emmerich

Pokemon (18)

  • 4 Ralts
  • 3 Kirlia
  • 3 Gardevoir GX
  • 1 Gallade BKT
  • 1 Diancie BUS
  • 1 Remoraid (Stadium Discard)
  • 1 Octillery
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 1 Alolan Vulpix

Trainers (30)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 3 N
  • 3 Guzma
  • 2 Acerola
  • 1 Brigette
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Rare Candy
  • 2 Field Blower
  • 2 Choice Band
  • 1 Rescue Stretcher
  • 1 Super Rod
  • 1 Float Stone
  • 2 Parallel City

Energy (12)

  • 8 Fairy Energy
  • 4 Double Colorless Energy

I feel that most Gardevoir GX players have a similar skeleton. Plus 1/ Minus 1 Kirlia, the Pokémon count in this list is 4-3-3 Gardy/1 Gallade. Because this list includes 1 Diancie, I can see why there is an extra Kirlia in the Pokémon line. In addition, we see the Float Stone to take advantage of that Diancie play. Two Acerola is also something to point out in this list. As the Gardevoir player, you want to get into a two-shot war. Most likely you will win that war because of your ability to pop off a one-hit KO in the following turn. Another reason is the healing that you can play in the deck. The two Acerola is interesting because with Octillery you are able to draw (with Octillery) and heal (playing the Acerola supporter card) in the same turn. He can also abuse Twilight GX in which his two-of count for Acerola is justified. One last thing I’d like to point out is his two copies of Parallel City. Having tested with Parallel City this card makes your opponent wary about their bench space. This card can also help you remove those pesky Tapu Leles or damaged Pokémon on your bench that acts as a liability. Another sneaky play is to point the less 20 damage towards your opponent. This forces your opponents active Grass, Fire or Water-type Pokémon to hit 20 less to your active Pokémon. Cards like Golisopod GX, Turtonator GX, Ho-Oh GX, Greninja, and Tapu Bulu GX have to think twice before attacking your active.

Let’s check its recent successes

My fellow teammate and one of my closer testing buddies, Kenny Britton, piloted his 9th place Gardevoir list at the Hartford Regional Championships. His awesome techs showed us how crucial each card is throughout the tournament. Let’s take a look:

Gardevoir

Pokemon (19)

  • 4 Ralts
  • 3 Kirlia
  • 3 Gardevoir GX
  • 1 Gallade BKT
  • 1 Oranguru SM
  • 1 Remoraid (Stadium Discard)
  • 1 Octillery
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 1 Alolan Vulpix
  • 1 Mr.Mime

Trainers (29)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 3 N
  • 3 Guzma
  • 2 Acerola
  • 1 Brigette
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Rare Candy
  • 2 Field Blower
  • 2 Choice Band
  • 1 Rescue Stretcher
  • 1 Float Stone
  • 2 Parallel City

Energy (12)

  • 8 Fairy Energy
  • 4 Double Colorless Energy

We can see a lot of similarities between Philipp and Kenny’s lists. One of the differences is that Kenny went with a single Vulpix as his lead and a tech Mr. Mime. After hearing much debate about who should be the lead attacker in Gardevoir GX decks, I prefer a single Alolan Vulpix. Other options include Diancie, Eevee to evolve into Sylveon GX, or a combination of the two. In the beginning of games, I noticed that the majority of the time my active starter was neither of these desired starters. Therefore, I was still able to capitalize on having a solid start when having Alolan Vulpix in my deck because I can Brigette for that Pokémon and use an energy to retreat and attack for free. With Diancie and Eevee, you really rely on a Float Stone or retreat mechanism in order to set up on the first turn.

Kenny also played Mr. Mime as he noticed that this card was remarkable in spread decks. Cards such as Tapu Koko, Necrozma GX and Ninetales GX are almost useless because of one tech card. This also shuts down one of your opponent’s strategy to beating Gardevoir GX which is to rack up damage on bench Gardevoirs to utilize Espeon EX’s Miraculous Shine attack. Since the fastest way to do that is through spread, Mr. Mime can really negate that strategy.

From the recent League Cup results, Gardevoir GX has really stayed consistent at the top as shown from the finishes below:
Pasadena, CA 9/24/17- 1st place & 7th place
Tulsa, OK 9/24/17- 1st place
San Jose, CA 9/24/17- 5th Place
Westland, MI 9/24/17- 2nd Place
Fortaleza, Brazil 9/24/17- 1st ,2nd, and 7th Place
Santiago, Chili 9/24/17- 1st and 2nd place
Florida 9/23/17- 2nd place (Igor Costa) and 6th place

Here is my list that I would play

Gardevoir

Pokemon (16)

  • 4 Ralts
  • 2 Kirlia
  • 3 Gardevoir GX
  • 1 Gallade BKT
  • 1 Remoraid (Stadium Discard)
  • 1 Octillery
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 1 Alolan Vulpix

Trainers (32)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 4 N
  • 3 Guzma
  • 2 Acerola
  • 2 Brigette
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Rare Candy
  • 2 Field Blower
  • 2 Choice Band
  • 1 Rescue Stretcher
  • 3 Max Potion
  • 1 Parallel City

Energy (12)

  • 8 Fairy Energy
  • 4 Double Colorless Energy

The idea behind this list is very simple. Consistency + Heal. The goal for all Stage 2 decks is to get your Stage 2 Pokémon into play without taking an early hit in the beginning of the game. With two Brigettes, Vulpix, 4 Ralts and 3 Tapu Lele, I hope that setting up basics would be the least of my worries. The idea is to get two Gardevoirs and an Octillery established, putting pressure on your opponent’s Pokémon while healing with the triple Max Potions and double Acerolas.

Favorable matchups: Ho-Oh Salazzle, Volcanion, Drampa Garbodor, Vika Bulu, Waterbox

Unfavorable matchups: Metagross, Greninja, Solgaleo GX/Rayquaza

Even matchups: Golisopod, Ninetales

[Because this article is to describe the current Metagame and the Tier 1 decks for Vancouver, I will not go in depth with matchups. However, I will explain some matchups that I believe that you should be prepared for with certain decks. If you have any questions about how to approach a matchup, please feel free to comment or send me or the team a message. ]

Gardevoir vs Golisopod: As the Gardevoir player you really have to prepare your deck and card choices against Golisopod. In this example let us use a classic Golisopod/Garb as our deck to beat. Using my list above we really have to stay consistent against Golisopod. It takes very little for them to start attacking and our first priority is getting two Gardevoir GX’s online. Almost all of the time you should prioritize Gardevoir over Gallade in this matchup. In addition, healing and forcing them to continuously use Acerola/Guzma is our way to beat the deck. A timely Twilight GX play after exhausting your resources can really hurt the Golisopod player in the long run. In the games that I have played against Golisopod, it is usually a long drawn out game one. This is something to keep in mind when you are playing a best of three against Golisopod.

Spicy Techs to consider playing in Gardevoir GX

1-1 Sylveon GX
Magical Ribbon can help you set up and Plea GX can really sting at certain times. In one of the League Cups in my area Sylveon GX paired with Gardevoir GX had won because all the Gardevoir player did the first four turns was set up through Magical Ribbon and proceed to go ham with loaded Gardevoirs. During the Hartford Regionals there was an amazing turn by Pablo Meza where he played his Parallel City and used Plea GX to completely ruin his opponent’s board state.

1 Turtonator GX
Russell LaParre goes in depth in his article about this card. I love it! Check his previous article out.

1 Necrozma GX
The theory behind this card is to play a heavy Guzma line and use an early game Black Ray GX attack with Necrozma. After this, your opponents field has softened up so that you can one shot without overextending your Gardevoir GX.

1 Mr. Mime
This card can be used as a protection from Tapu Koko, Ninetales GX, and Necrozma GX. In fact, this card will tremendously help your Ninetales matchup.

2 Assault Vest
Against Golisopod this can turn their two shot into a three-shot if they use a Rainbow Energy or attack with Armor Press. Although Field Blower is a thing, a timely Assault Vest can be enough to hold them off for one turn.

1 Tapu Koko
This card has seen some action with Gardevoir. It can help to finish off those Pokémon that weren’t able to be KO-ed by Gardevoir in a single turn. It can also soften up your opponents Pokémon to make the numbers easier for Gardevoir to hit.

1 Giratina Promo
After a slight showing of Greninja this card makes this matchup favorable.

Golisopod GX

When talking about Golisopod GX, the popular partner is Garbodor. With both Garbodors this deck provides that quick attack with added disruption against your opponent. Although the expectations from Golisopod weren’t as big as Gardevoir, it made an immediate impact. In the World Championship a lot of the Japanese players brought this deck into the scene. From then on we knew that this deck had the potential to become a powerhouse in the Standard Metagame.

With 210 HP and the ability to swing massive damage for a single energy attachment, Golisopod was appealing because it didn’t take much for this deck to operate. Unlike most decks where you need a double attachment or a Rare Candy into an evolution, with Golisopod you really only need an Ultra-Ball and an energy to start applying pressure.
Its GX attack is a very underrated attack. They need to play Acerola and Guzma to stream the First Impression attack, but a Golisopod with a Choice Band can one-hit-knock-out a 180 HP Pokémon. Pokémon such as Drampa GX, Volcanion, EX, Tapu Bulu GX and Tapu Lele GX are all liabilities now.

Let’s check out this deck’s recent successes:

Here is Marc Lutz’s winning list from the Bremen Regional Championships:

Golisopod GX/Garbodor

Pokemon (17)

  • 3 Wimpod
  • 3 Golisopod GX
  • 3 Trubbish BKP
  • 2 Garbodor BKP
  • 1 Garbodor GRI
  • 1 Tapu Koko SUM31
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 1 Tapu Fini GX

Trainers (32)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 4 Guzma
  • 4 N
  • 3 Acerola
  • 1 Brigette
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Float Stone
  • 4 Choice Band
  • 2 Field Blower
  • 1 Rescue Stretcher
  • 1 Heavy Ball

Energy (11)

  • 4 Double Colorless Energy
  • 4 Rainbow Energy Energy
  • 3 Grass Energy

There are some card choices that I would like to point out for players that may not be familiar with this deck. This deck consists of two different stage 1 Pokémon. Because neither are actual “tech” cards, the three basic and three Stage 1 count is justified. The Tapu Fini GX had me think for a bit. I like this card in a lot of ways. Not only does it help you remove a threat that you otherwise couldn’t with Golisopod GX but it also slows down your opponent’s tempo. For example, when your opponent plays Fire and uses the supporter card Kiawe on his or her first turn, Tapu Fini GX lets you cancel that tempo rush with its GX attack. Another thing I’d like to point out is the energy line. While some would say that 12 should be the minimum, this list shows us that 11 energy is just fine. Why bring the energy line up? Finding the right amount of energy is important because you don’t want to cut an energy if it makes the deck inconsistent; however, you also want to have space in your decks for other important cards and usually, the cut of a card is made within the energy line. I can see playing 11 energy in this deck being the norm as Marc has proven the consistency with it by getting first place.

Here are Golisopod’s recent league cup finishes:

Pasadena, CA 9/24/17- 3rd place
Bristol, TN 9/24/17- 1st place
Jenks, OK 9/23/17- 1st place and 3rd place
Joinville, Brazil 9/23/17- 1st place
Cumming, GA 9/10/17- 1st place

Here is the version of the deck that I would play for Vancouver:

Golisopod GX/Garbodor

Pokemon (18)

  • 4 Wimpod
  • 3 Golisopod GX
  • 3 Trubbish BKP
  • 2 Garbodor BKP
  • 1 Garbodor GRI
  • 2 Tapu Koko SUM31
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX

Trainers (31)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 4 Guzma
  • 4 N
  • 3 Acerola
  • 1 Brigette
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Float Stone
  • 3 Choice Band
  • 2 Field Blower
  • 1 Rescue Stretcher
  • 1 Heavy Ball

Energy (11)

  • 4 Double Colorless Energy
  • 4 Rainbow Energy Energy
  • 3 Grass Energy

As I quickly realized, I had a lot of similarities with Marc’s deck. The additions I really liked were having two Tapu Koko’s and the 4th Wimpod. Going into big Regionals I always want to make sure my deck is consistent. Why? I believe in my skill set and I feel that given the ability to play the deck without drawing like poop gives me an out to always win. Therefore, the two Tapu Kokos were added to this deck for the boost in consistency. I really like to target Tapu Koko my first turn with Brigette and retreat my Wimpod to it. I also like to put pressure on my opponents’ Pokémon and soften them up with Tapu Koko’s first attack. My original list played an extra Grass Energy and one less Field Blower. Because Marc showed us that 11 works just fine I cut the Grass Energy for the extra Field Blower. There were games where taking the Choice Band off your opponent’s Gardevoir made them miss the OHKO. I also like to attach a Float Stone to my first Golisopod so that I can guarantee a second First Impression attack the following turn without having to play Acerola or Guzma. Two Field Blowers allow me to attach a Choice Band after discarding the Float Stone with my own Field Blower. This card also lets you discard your opponent’s Stadium when you otherwise don’t play any. I really like the options this card can give you.

Favorable matchups: Vika Bulu, Waterbox, Metagross, Greninja, Solgaleo GX/Rayquaza

Unfavorable matchups: Ho-Oh Salazzle, Volcanion, Drampa Garbodor

Even matchups: Gardevoir, Ninetales

In my testing, I’ve found it more often or not that I kept having a hard time against Drampa Garbodor.

Here is how I see this matchup:

As the Drampa/Garb player, you’re MVP card is Po Town. Po Town brings Golisopod to 180 HP giving the Drampa player the opportunity to one hit KO the Golisopod. Drampa Garb is the more consistent deck of the two and the energy tempo can also swing the game. As the Golisopod player, you want to make sure that you do not commit multiple energy onto a single Golisopod. In any case where the Drampa player can not one shot your Pokémon you are in good position. However, playing N and having Garbotoxin out at the same time can really set you back mid game when you are fishing for multiple resources. I really try to take advantage of First Impression the entire game and not letting Po Town dictate my damage. So if this means holding off your evolution for one turn I would do so.

Spicy Techs


2-2 Octillery

While we see this card in expanded because VS Seeker is amazing in this deck, we really don’t see it in the standard format because Garbotoxin is just too good. If you can find ways to disrupt your opponent’s field, Octillery can be a very sneaky play.

1 or 2 Enhanced Hammer
I’ve seen this card pop up in Golisopod decks for a while. An added disruption card seems almost viable in a deck that plays Garbotoxin. It almost reminds me of the past when Garbotoxin was paired with Toad and hammers.

1 Golisopod GRI
This card has been hiding under the radar because of its high cost to attack. Given the right opportunity, this one prize attacker can really swing a game. I’ve found this useful as a sweeper to get those last two prizes. This card definitely has the surprise factor going for it.

2-2 Weavile
3 stage 1, are you crazy?!?! Actually, I’m not. Like I said earlier, the reason why people play 3 basic and 3 Stage 1 counts for their Stage 1 line is due to the fact that Garbodor and Golisopod aren’t really tech cards. However, splash in a 2-2 Weavile line and these cards are definitely techs. You don’t really need to rush with this card. Its decent for hitting Tapu Lele or Gardevoir after attacking them with first impression. You’d be surprised how good this card is.

1 Drampa GX
In Hartford, Peter Kica ran one Drampa GX. In my opinion, this one-of card can solve many of Golisipod’s issues. Drampa can solve the decks mid game inconsistencies by using Big Wheel GX and it serves as a secondary attacker to Golisipod.

Fire (Ho-Oh Salazzle GX)

This is the last deck to fit in our Tier 1 list. This deck was another one of that flew under the radar until some of the Japanese players took this deck to Worlds. Not only does this deck include the fastest T1 set-ups with the Kiawe supporter, but it also has one of the strongest late game hitters with Salazzle GX. Barring the Water weakness, this deck has shown its place in the current Metagame. Having great matchups against Fire weak decks such as Golisopod and Metagross, many players have opted to use this deck because of the Fire typing.

Here is Patrick Van Story’s List that he used to Top 8 Hartford Regionals:

Ho-Oh Salazzle

Pokemon (13)

  • 3 Ho-Oh GX
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 2 Salandit
  • 2 Salazzle GX
  • 1 Volcanion EX
  • 1 Turtonator GX
  • 1 Oranguru

Trainers (33)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 3 N
  • 3 Guzma
  • 3 Kiawe
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Choice Band
  • 3 Max Elixir
  • 2 Float Stone
  • 2 Nest Ball
  • 1 Field Blower
  • 1 Super Rod
  • 1 Switch
  • 2 Scorched Earth

Energy (14)

  • 14 Fire Energy

The one thing that had me speculating about this deck its consistency. Oddly enough, the best starter in this deck is optimized by using 3 Ho-Oh GX with 3 Tapu Lele’s and 3 Kiawe. As the opponent to this deck you are hoping that this deck doesn’t use Kiawe first turn. I really appreciate some of the counts in this deck. The two Scorched Earth in this deck are what really stood out. Usually, I’ve seen this deck play Brooklet Hill or even more draw supporters, but opting for the two Scorched Earth makes it seem that it really wants to dig for more cards. I would like to point out that this deck plays no regular Volcanion. In most of the decks I have seen, they have included at least one copy of this card to help with mid-game energy acceleration. However, I can see this deck opting not to use it because of the many draw supports and energy acceleration that is already built in.

Here are the league cup finishes with Ho-Oh Salazzle:

Pasadena, CA 9/24/17- 2nd place
Tulsa, OK 9/24/17- 2nd place
Fortaleza, Brazil 9/24/17- 4th place
Blumenau, Brazil 9/24/17- 1st place and 6th place
Skokie, IL 9/23/17- 1st,3rd, 5th and 6th place

The recent League Cup results show that Ho-Oh Salazzle does belong in the Tier 1 list. As discussed earlier, this deck really utilizes its typing to exploit its matchups. As long as Golisopod is a Tier 1 deck, this deck will stay at a Tier 1 level.

Here is my list that I would consider for Vancouver:

Ho-Oh Salazzle

Pokemon (15)

  • 4 Ho-Oh GX
  • 3 Tapu Lele GX
  • 2 Salandit
  • 2 Salazzle GX
  • 1 Volcanion EX
  • 1 Volcanion
  • 1 Turtonator GX
  • 1 Oranguru

Trainers (31)

  • 4 Professor Sycamore
  • 4 Guzma
  • 3 N
  • 3 Kiawe
  • 4 Ultra Ball
  • 4 Max Elixir
  • 3 Choice Band
  • 2 Float Stone
  • 1 Super Rod
  • 1 Switch
  • 2 Scorched Earth

Energy (14)

  • 14 Fire Energy

This list is very similar to Patrick’s deck. I love the 4th Ho-Oh. It gives me more options to start this card in the beginning of the game and really increases my outs to getting a T1 Kiawe. I really appreciate the 3rd Choice Band in this deck because after using one on your initial Ho-Oh GX, you really only have one more left to put on Salazzle or another attacker. By including the 3rd Choice Band, it gives you more options later in the game without really overcommitting the 4th spot. I really don’t use Oranguru in the early or mid-part of the game, I only use it as a safeguard to an N down to one card. In games where the opponent is playing Garbodor, I don’t even bother to get this card out. In addition, I don’t play any Field Blowers in this deck because there is no tool that really annoys the deck. I can possibly see fitting one Blower but I’d rather keep consistency. To counter Stadiums such as Parallel City I opted to go with 2 Scorched Earth because it helps me dig for that T1 Kiawe.

Favorable matchups: Golisopod, Volcanion, Waterbox, Metagross, Solgaleo GX/Rayquaza, Drampa Garbodor

Unfavorable matchups: Gardevoir, Greninja, Vika Bulu

Even matchups: Ninetales

I believe that this deck has very good matchups against the field. The reason for this deck not being the outright BDIF is due to its poor Gardevoir matchup. Yes, you can rush them down with a turn one Kiawe, but as long as they are able to respond with a single Gardevoir, it will definitely see the tables turn in mid game.

Spicy Techs

Fighting Fury Belt
Many decks had played this card to keep Ho-Oh on the field. With a 190 base HP, the Fighting Fury Belt makes it so that Ho-Oh GX is now a basic swinging with 230 HP.

Sudowoodo
This card saw play when Sky Field decks were a thing. Now that this card is under the radar, it may very well be time for a comeback. It is good in this deck because there isn’t much of a problem with bench space. You can also add Brooklet Hill for this card and Volcanion EX as well.

Giratina Promo
Greninja is a bad matchup and Giratina promo simply shuts down its ability. The reason Greninja has fallen off the grid is due to this card. If you don’t want to take the chance of losing to Greninja I would highly consider playing this card to make the matchup not so much of an auto loss.

My Deck Choice

My deck choice for the upcoming tournaments would have to be Gardevoir GX. I like its matchups and its consistent game plan. I would definitely play the list I posted above because it adds that necessary pressure while sustaining a great end game result. I also feel that I can definitely take the loss to Metal if necessary. I expect to see tons of new Tier 1 decks. I wouldn’t be surprised if I saw Ninetales, Vikavolt Bulu, and Greninja all make Top 32 in Vancouver Regionals. It’s the nature of our game to expect the unexpected.
I can’t wait to see some of you at Vancouver regionals next weekend!
Until then, GOODLUCK TRAINERS!

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